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Korean
Has faults considering acceptable dog meat soup kitchens which were closed by law during the Olympics; now faces public outcry by Brigitte Bardot who wants dogs protected during the 2002 World Cup.

As a national cuisine, best that is between China and Japan, thus drawing from both cultures. Sad to note the national dish may be rotten (my descriptive) cabbage, actually a fiery pickling of Chinese cabbage, radishes, cucumber, and any available vegetables that are shredded and buried in an urn to ferment, served with every Korean meal. I am not a fan of Korean fare, so live with it.

May I put this gently: Korean food cultures are not to my total appreciation. Once I dared to inquire as to content in a menu note of "fish soup." The proud chef showed me to his kitchen, noting "everything fresh."  He was right. One pot he was fixing for his family included "fresh" fish eyes and fish heads, eyes removed, onions, green tassels from carrots, pork trimmings, what appeared to be kale, all in a brown stock loaded with soy. 

One menu note: If you see gop chang jun gol on tonight's Korean menu, inquire as to origin of the beef stomach being simmered in a peppery soup. Now you know why I support ingredient listings on menus. Of all Asian cuisines, Korean fare falls into the each-to-his-own classification.
                            

   




morton salt logo

Kosher Salt
   
Kosher salt has long been used by chefs because they like how it feels in their hands, allowing them to pick up just the right “dash” to throw into their dish. They also like it because it has great flavor, keeps things moist and looks nice as a garnish. Kosher salt’s popularity in the home is drastically increasing as everyday cooks are becoming more experimental and realizing its amazing qualities. In most cases, it can be used as you would table salt, but delivers a cleaner, truer zing.

Morton Kosher Salt is the preferred brand, as America’s salt authority has been producing salt for over 150 years. Morton Kosher Salt can be used in brines or rubs to add distinctive flavor to meats and poultry, in fall vegetable dishes like squash or sweet potatoes, or to give stews and soups a spark.      
Doreen Jarman
doreen.jarman@sea.ddb.com





 
Latin American
Too general; pick a nation and stick with it; e.g. yucca while grown in most of South America, may be a staple and have market importance mostly in Peru. If you want to upset Idaho, campaign for yucca root to replace potatoes...which ain't a bad idea in my domain.


 
Lebanese
Tabbouleh or not to be much more than a batch of tasteless bulgur wheat made edible with seasonings of mint, green onions, cucumbers, tomatoes, olive oil, salt, pepper, best when pinched between pita; plus anything held in rolled-up grape leaves.                            

   
Le Cordon de Grease
Any duck (get French for same) or goose prep in France


 
Lowcountry
Correct spelling, so dictates food writers in Charleston, S. C.
                            

   
Machine Cuisine
Rhymes, yep, but understood when asking questions in Chi-Chi's, McDonald's, Applebee's, any eatery serving food that has never touched human hands - only a stamping machine spewing product onto a conveyer belt.


 
Malaysian
Where fusion was invented. Mystical mixings of rice, noodles and tubers as carriers for seafood and pork; condiments of coconut milk, shallots, fiery chili peppers, tamarind, lemongrass, coriander leaf, salted soybeans (taucheo), and ginger.

Mediterranean Where one-pot cookery originated as stir-fry.
                            

   
Mediterranean
Med/Rim, also too general considering countries/cultures rimming that big pond.


 
Mexican
                            

   
Middle Eastern


 
Mongolian
An oily mess of anything edible from bleak countrysides, starting with oxen, stirred and tossed together in yak grease on a flat platen over open fire; best appreciated if taken prisoner or otherwise detained in Outer Mongolia.                            

   
Moroccan
Hard grains infused with sand, spices and preserved lemon, lots of fresh goat; the utensil of choice for street vendors is a skewer.

Want proof of damaging evidence relating to Morocco's food? Name one food item served in the movie Casablanca. Rick's gin joint didn't have a kitchen.


 

 
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2006